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Regan

Regan

Wednesday, 08 February 2023 00:58

How to Make Your Next Party Accessible

Whether you’re hosting your next party or gathering at your home, at work, or at an event venue, there are important things to consider to make sure the event is accessible.

1. Consider Access Needs

Whichever venue function you choose, make sure to be mindful of access needs.

You will need to consider things like accessible parking and wheelchair ramps as a starting point.

You will also need to consider the width of your walkways, whether there are any tripping hazards throughout the venue, and whether public transportation is available nearby.

If you know you have guests coming that have guide dogs, ensure the venue allows this and the space can be made comfortable for the guidedog (e.g. access to water and shelter).

Remember, accessibility isn’t one-size-fits-all. Talk to your guests about their individual access needs during the planning phase.

2. Spacing and Seating

Some of your guests may feel overwhelmed by cramped or overly crowded, loud spaces. Make sure you take this into consideration during the planning phase.

You may also want to create a quiet zone or kids zone – a quiet zone could be for anyone who needs some relaxation and time away from the party, and the kids zone could play amongst them selves with sensory toys or items.

3. Food and Dietary Requirements

Remember to take note of the food and dietary requirements of your guests. This can be done when they RSVP – so make sure to include that this information is required when you send invites out. Some of the dietary requirements may be – pureed food, vegan and vegetarian options, and nut and dairy free.

You also want to consider different types of cutlery options to suit everyone’s needs. 

4. Go Hybrid

Lastly, as our technology now allows – you may want to consider going hybrid with your event. Streaming events via Zoom, Microsoft Teams or other programs has become increasingly popular – especially for more corporate events.

This allows visitors to decide whether they want to attend your event in-person or online.

If you have any other ideas or recommendations to add to our above list, please let us know at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

 

Published in News

The way we write about, refer to, and talk to people with disability is important. Words are powerful.


In a nutshell, when writing about people with disability:
• emphasize abilities, not limitations
• ask people if they would like to disclose their disability before disclosing publicly
• refer to the person first, and theirdisability second
• portray successful people with a disability in a balanced manner, not as heroic or superhuman
• do not mention someone’s disability unless it is essential to your story
• do not use offensive or condescending language.


When talking to people with disability:
• never speak about the person assuming they don’t understand or cannot respond.
• look them in the eyes and talk to them directly – don’t talk to their Support Worker and/or Mentor, interpreter, family member, or companion instead. And listen attentively!
• remember, adults with disabilities are adults – speak to them as adults.
• don’t touch or talk to a guide dog or service animal – these animals are working so shouldn’t be distracted.
• do not touch a person’s mobility equipment without permission.


As a general rule (there are always exceptions and personal preferences), here are some examples of do’s and don’ts:


Use “person with a disability, people with disabilities” | Don’t use “Disabled person; the disabled”


Use “Person with paraplegia” | Don’t use “paraplegic; paraplegic man”


Use “person with a learning disability” | Don’t use “slow learner”

Use “student receiving special education services” | Don’t use “special education student”


Use “a person of short stature” or “little person” | Don’t use “dwarf” or “midget”


Use “person who uses a wheelchair” | Don’t use “wheelchair bound”


Use “person who uses a communication device” or “person who uses an alternative method of communication” | Don’t use “is non-verbal” or “can’t talk”


Use “accessible parking” | Don’t use “handicapped parking”


Use
“accessible bathroom” or “accessible restroom” | Don’t use “disabled restroom” or “disabled bathroom”


Use
“person without disabilities” | Don’t use “normal” or “able-bodied person”


Information derived from https://adata.org/factsheet/ADANN-writing and https://www.respectability.org/inclusion-toolkits/etiquette-interacting-with-people-with-disabilities/

 

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

 

Published in News

Alltrails.com have recently updated their walking trails listings across South Australia and Australia to now include all trails that are wheelchair friendly.


Check out some of the wheelchair friendly walking trails below…


Torrens Linear Track Loop, Adelaide Park Lands

This 2.9km loop trail provides a scenic view of the River Torrens and, as its located in the Adelaide CBD, it is very popular, so you're likely to encounter other people while exploring.

Patawalonga River Walk, Adelaide

This 3.9km loop trail is an easy route and has an accessible path around the river. There are views of both the river and the ocean during the trauk, and there are plenty of amenities like public restrooms, picnic areas and shops along the way.

Sturt River Linear Park Trail, Marion

This is a 13.8km shared trail for cyclists, wheelchair users and prams, which can be taken in sections. Spot cockatoos and fig trees along the way. Please note: The Camden Oval has accessible parking. Several parts of this trail have a steep (over 12.5%) slope.

Coast Park Path, Moana

This 8.4km is located in Moana, and is a popular trail but is a peaceful stroll during the quieter times of the day. This is a scenic trail, with beautiful views of the Adelaide coastline.

Happy Valley Woodland Loop, Happy Valley

This is a 3.9km loop trail is home to an abundance of wildlife (including kangaroos!) and starts and ends from a free parking area. It’s also great for birdwatching and fishing!

Little Quarry Loop, Anstey Hill Recreation Park

This is a short 0.6km loop trail near Athelstone, and is a quick stroll for anyone who wants to enjoy a peaceful route. The trail is mostly level and the terrain is hard packed gravel. Start near the main carpark!

Shamus Liptrot Cycling Trail, Balaklava


This 18.7km trail was named in honour of an elite junior cyclist of the same name, and follows an abandoned rail line connecting Balaklava to Halbury. The trail is made of crushed gravel and is mostly flat. This is a bit of a longer trail, taking an average of just over four hours to complete, so make sure to pack lots of water and snacks.

 

These are just some of the wheelchair-friendly trails across Adelaide and regional South Australia. For a full list, head to Alltrails.com and select their “suitability” drop down button, and look for “wheelchair friendly.” Clicking here will take you to the page.

 

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

 

Published in News

Did you know that at Access4u, we offer a CHC33015 Certificate III in Individual Support (Disability) to all of our Mentors?


Our Cert III, in partnership with CEG Training Partnerships (RTO Code: 40138), is a great way for our Mentors to earn and learn more. The training is flexible and supportive, and provides the essential skills needed to better care for Access4u customers.


Our current Mentors and Cert III graduates, Reggie, Sophie and Nathan, share their thoughts on the journey to becoming a Mentor and successfully completing their training.


How would you describe the Cert III?


“I finished my Cert III at the end of last year… You do the training at the same time you start doing the shifts, the studying is really easy. You get a lot of help with it,” Reggie says.


“I decided I wanted to go with CEG because I wanted to be fully equipped to support the client and I wanted the best knowledge I could [have]. CEG was really flexible and really suited my lifestyle – I could fit my study around work instead of having to fit my clients around my study,” Sophie says.


“The team [at Access4u] said there was this pathway available through CEG to get the Cert III… If I wanted to further my career in the sector it was a good idea. The flexibility [with CEG training] is great and the information I get is laid out all in front of me… the study is quite flexible, I am able to do other hobbies,” says Nathan.


Would you recommend becoming a Mentor at Access4u?


“I think it would a good idea for lots of people to look into this [Mentoring]… Mainly because lots of people don’t really know it exists, or they immediately think it’s like nursing or in-home care. I say there’s a lot of things people need help with and you don’t need to do a lot of studying… I think there’s a lot of people who are really empathetic and really good at helping other people who don’t realise there’s a perfect job out there for them,” says Reggie.


“Being able to have these kinds of long-term relationships with clients is excellent… You can look back at where they started and see how much things have changed.”


“On Wednesdays, I support a client that I have seen regularly for over two years now… It’s always a fun day [with this client], some days we might go to Monarto… it’s a lot of things I haven’t even done before so it’s always fun and exciting,” says Sophie. “I love seeing him out in the community.”


To hear more from our Mentors, check out their full-length video testimonials.
Reggie > https://youtu.be/raCKPwNTfrY
Sophie > https://youtu.be/UaSFvlW0q7E
Nathan > https://youtu.be/JAAcYkjSrY4


Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.


To learn more about CHC33015 Certificate III in Individual Support (Disability), click here.

 

Published in News
Monday, 28 November 2022 23:06

Access4u Launches 2021-22 Impact Report

Access4u has launched their first ever Impact Report, which details the 2021-22 financial year.

The report reflects the substantial amount of growth Access4u has experienced over the past year.

"This report features some of our biggest highlights of the past financial year, including our expansion to the Adelaide Hills and Fleurieu Peninsula regions; engaging customer stories that reflect why we do what we do; as well a year in review snapshot," Cathy Miller, CEO of Access4u, says.

Despite the COVID-19 related challenges the past financial year brought, Access4u is happy to report that they are bigger and better than ever, with an increase in their customer base of 32% and staff numbers growing by 31%.

"Throughout our growth, our amazing staff stayed true to Access4u's values and continued to provide innovative and tailored services to each individual we support."

To Access4u customers and families, thank you for trusting us to support your loved ones.

We look forward to the future, as we continue to grow and expand our delivery of quality services to those who need it most.

You can view our Impact Report here.

 

 

Published in News
Thursday, 17 November 2022 23:28

Access4u Opens New Mount Barker Office

On Wednesday 16 November Access4u hosted an official launch of their new Mount Barker office.

Over 90 guests attended, including local dignitaries, council members, local community members and NDIS participants.

The event started with an incredible Welcome to Country from Uncle Moogy, and followed with speeches from Access4u CEO Cathy Miller and Mayor of Mount Barker, Ann Ferguson. A symbolic ribbon was cut by four NDIS participants and Access4u customers to highlight the official opening.

Access4u prides themselves on bringing an innovative perspective to the NDIS, and say expanding to the Adelaide Hills was always on the cards.

“Having a regional presence has always been important to us. Since our inception, we have been aware of the growing population – and, as a result, the growing demand - across Mount Barker and the Adelaide Hills,” Ms. Miller says.

“With several NDIS providers already in the area doing great work, we view ourselves as a complementary NDIS service – focusing on Support Coordination, Support Workers and Therapeutic Supports, including Positive Behaviour Support and Psychology.”

Since opening their office in Mount Barker, Access4u has already seen enormous growth, which is a reflection of how much their services are needed in the region.

Access4u also pride themselves on staying local and community-minded.

“All of our staff are local to Mount Barker. They’re passionate about the community and know the region well. And they’re committed to putting customers at the heart of everything they do.”

“I look forward to seeing our Mount Barker office grow more and more over the coming years.”

Access4u’s new office can be found at 68 Hutchinson Street, Mount Barker.

 

Dr John Wyett Adjt. Professor Lyn Hepburn Brown Cathy Miller CEO Richard Perkins Board Members of Access4u

 

Published in News

Supported Independent Living (also referred to as SIL) is a NDIS support. At Access4u, it comes under our Home and Living supports and can be found in your NDIS plan under CORE Supports.

According to the NDIS, SIL is a support that helps you “live in your home. It includes help or supervision with daily tasks, like personal care or cooking meals. It helps you live as independently as possible, while building your skills.

Supported independent living is for people with higher support needs, who need some level of help at home all the time.”

If you have Supported Independent Living available to you in your NDIS plan, it may include:
• help with personal care
• building skills - like meal preparation and cooking, cleaning, and developing a routine and social skills
• help to action any behaviour support plans you have
• support with supervision, personal safety and security
• support to give you your medication and attending medical appointments
• support to get to and from community access activities.

It does not include the cost of your groceries, your rent, any utilities, and does not include supported not related to your disability – including household budgeting or expenses related to travelling or holidays.

At Access4u, we want you to be able to choose where you live, who you live with and what support you need.

We provide long-term and permanent accommodation to SIL participants. We know that a one-size-fits-all approach doesn’t work – so, we’ll ensure that you’re living with people that you get along with.

Your unique care and support needs are always considered to ensure this service meets you and your personal goals. After all, it’s your choice and your life – we’re just here to help!

Do you have SIL in your plan? Are you currently looking to change providers? Reach out to our friendly team on 1800 022 237. We can talk you through your options and the vacancies we currently have available!

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

Published in News
Sunday, 16 October 2022 22:57

Meet our Customers: Will & Kathleen

Meet Will!

Over two years ago, Will’s family chose Access4u to support them in using their NDIS plan. Our experienced team connected Will to the supports he needed using our resources, expertise and industry connections. This ultimately provided him with the best chance of reaching his goals.

Over time, we've been able to develop a great team of people who people understand Will. This has helped us support Will and has enabled him to increase his independence and achieve his goals.

Two years on and Will is now happily and independently living out of home with the support of his caring team.

willheyson

Image: Will and his Support Worker strolling along the beach.

 

Meet Kathleen!

Kathleen has been with Access4u for nearly a year and lives independently with 2 other friends. Her house is assisted by ongoing support workers that support her to enjoy various activities outside the home.

When making the transition to Access4u, Kathleen was able to stay with some of her Support Workers who had been supporting her for years. This made the transition more comfortable for Kathleen, as she continued to be supported by people who knew her and could seamlessly provide her with assistance in her new environment.

Now Kathleen has settled into a new routine and is very happy in her new home. Her favourite activity is playing with beads. After filling up her cup with beads, Kathleen will pour them all out and start again!

kathleen

Image: Kathleen playing with her beads.

 

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

Published in News
Thursday, 15 September 2022 06:02

Meet our Customers: Kurt & Jenny

Meet Kurt!

As of 2022, Kurt has been with Access4u for nearly 2 years, since he decided he wanted to move out of home.

Kurt is a confident artist who is regularly creating new fantastic works of art in his room and uploading it to his own Instagram page. 

When he isn't in the art room, Kurt is focused on living a healthy lifestyle and makes sure to regularly eat well and exercise. From regular long walks to shooting hoops at basketball, Kurt is very driven to stay healthy and fit.

kurt1

Image: Kurt and his friend at their basketball game.

To maintain his health off the court, Kurt has started his own veggie garden in his backyard. Kurt even gave us a sneak peak into his private garden of assorted vegetables and herbs as they came into season!

 

kurt4

Image: Kurt and his greenhouse.

 

Meet Jenny!

Jenny joined Access4u in 2021. Jenny is non-verbal and has difficulty walking but loves to swim! Jenny was referred to Access4u in search of new activities outside the house.

Through understanding Jenny's passions and motivations, the team at Access4u were able to set up hydrotherapy sessions with a Mentor that specifically suited her needs.

Jenny now regularly swims with her Mentor, who writes a weekly progress report for her team and family to be updated on.

Jenny’s Mentor has described herself 'getting tingles' in response to Jenny's big grin as soon as she enters the water. After many sessions Jenny now only requires minimal support as she looks to only further increase her independence in the pool. Well done, Jenny!

Jenny Tosach 3

 Image: Jenny and her instructor in the pool. 

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

Published in News

Not only is it important for businesses and organisations to make their social media more accessible and inclusive, it’s also something we should practice ourselves on our personal channels.

Here are our top tips to make your social media more accessibility friendly….

1. Image Descriptions / Alt Descriptions

Using image descriptions or “alt text” is important for people who can’t see the images you post – those are blind might use a screen reader (a tool that reads out text) or may just want the image described.

So, what are image descriptions?

Image descriptions are typically short description in the body of text that accompanies an image of a social media channel. Carly Findlay explains this well and has an example on her blog.

What is alt text?

Alt text is a written description of an image or a visual asset. For users with screen readers, this means they can experience a visual post or get further clarity on what’s in an image or GIF.

Alt text is to the point but descriptive. There are options to add alt text on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn.

2. Limit Your Use of Emojis!

We love emojis, but use them sparingly! Emojis, when read out via a Screenreader can be confusing. As Sprout Social mentions, “using 🌴😎🍹💃🏼🎉 for the caption on your holiday pictures is may be fun. However, those using a screen reader would hear “Palm Tree, Smiling Face With Sunglasses, Tropical Drink, Woman Dancing: Medium-Light Skin Tone, Party Popper." Now, that doesn't make much sense, does it? Choose one emoji to accompany your post, and that's it!

3. Make Your Text Accessible

Make sure your sentences are clear and succinct. When in doubt, Hemingway is a great tool.

Hootsuite has several great tips:

Write in plain and succinct language: Avoid jargon, slang, or technical terms unless they are appropriate.

Don’t overuse caps: Full-caps (e.g. FULLCAPS) can be difficult to read and misinterpreted by screen readers.

Use camel case for multi-word hashtags. Capitalise the first letter of each word to make hashtags more legible. (e.g. #DisabilityServiceProvider, rather than #disabilityserviceprovider)

4. Language Matters

Words as powerful. The way we portray individuals with disabilities matters. Be respectful and balanced – and be accurate, neutral and objective.

  • Emphasize abilities, not limitations.
  • Ask individuals in your posts if they are willing to disclose their disability.
  • Refer to the individual first, their disability second.
  • Portray successful people with a disability in a balanced way, not as heroic or superhuman.
  • Do not use offensive or condescending language.

Use:

  • Person with a disability, people with disabilities
  • Man with paraplegia
  • Person with a learning disability
  • Student receiving special education services
  • A person of short stature or little person
  • Person who uses a wheelchair
  • Person who uses a communication device or an alternative method of communication
  • Accessible parking
  • Accessible restroom
  • People without disabilities

Don’t use:

  • Disabled person; the disabled
  • Paraplegic; paraplegic man
  • Slow learner
  • Special education student
  • Dwarf or midget
  • Wheelchair bound
  • Is non-verbal; can’t talk
  • Handicapped parking
  • Disabled restroom
  • Normal, able-bodied

For more tips on how to make your social media accounts more accessible, visit these great resources:

Access4u is a not-for-profit organisation that helps guide you through the NDIS to ensure the most optimal and effective outcomes for your ongoing objectives. From your coordinator to your mentor, Access4u works towards your personal goals whilst increasing independence and adding value to every life we support.

We make a difference by providing personalised care to every individual and their aspirations. Through working with a diverse group of service providers we can ensure support for you in a timely, innovative, and flexible way. View our NDIS supports here.

Published in News
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